Tertre du Bois Boujon.

Publié 17/10/2018 18:07:46 Modifier 11/07/2019 12:00:04 par 489945901
It has long aroused the curiosity of Dijon archaeologists: for some, simple natural mound or feudal mound, tumulus for others.
#History #Tumulus #Hallstatt #Couchey

Period: from -5400 to 1201 years.

Situation and current status


This mound is located in a wood at the end of the "chemin aux cows", 600 m north-east of the tumulus of Bois de la Ronce, 1200 m west of the tumulus of Bois de Taviard and 1650 m southeast of the three mounds of the Rente-Neuve. It is an imposing mound (Fig. 11, No. 1), identified by P. Renard in the early 20th century. (Jobard, 1906). It has long aroused the curiosity of Dijon archaeologists: for some, simple natural mound or feudal mound, tumulus for others.
Its diameter is about 80 m and its height of 9.29 m.
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Fig. 11.
Photographs of the mound of Bois Boujon (shots B. Benoit).


Structure


The researchers of the time, not motivated to undertake such extensive earthworks with only pickaxes and shovels, have never dared to search. In his manuscript, E. Bertrand suggests: " ... To methodically explore this huge pile of materials, it would require large sums; but no doubt the result would be most interesting ... "

On the top there are flat stones standing on edge, aligned one against the other (Fig. 11, No. 2). Is it an anthropic or geological phenomenon? The question is still asked nowadays and that is why we wanted to mention this mound in the context of this article.

Reference


Jean-Pierre Devaux, " The protohistoric environment of Mount Africa: unpublished data on tumulus excavations carried out in the late nineteenth century. and in the early 20th century. in Couchey (Côte-d'Or) », Archeological Review of the East, Volume 56 | 2007, posted on February 20, 2009, accessed on November 16, 2015.

Author


Jean-Pierre Devaux, amateur archaeologist, 21 rue de la Combette, hamlet of Domois, 21600 Fenay, © All rights reserved.

Link to the original electronic documents:


https://rae.revues.org/5236
Location +/- 4 meters.



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